All posts by Scott R. Bialecki

The USPTO Giveth And Taketh Away

The USPTO announced earlier this year that it would be implementing a “Track One” expedited patent examination in early May in which applicants could pay a fee and receive accelerated examination of their patent applications. This was particularly appealing for tech-driven applications as the normal process can take years due to the backlog of applications and there was no requirement of discussing any relevant prior art (as is required in other types of accelerated review).  It has been reported that the USPTO announced today that its Track One program has been put on hold due to budget cuts.  Read a good discussion.  Many companies will be disappointed.

Take Your IP To The Next Level….

Companies often do not seek a coordinated strategy when approaching their IP and regulatory needs. Can this come back to haunt a company? Perhaps. We’ve all seen the following scenario. Many companies choose scientific-sounding names for their products to create an air of credibility with consumers. These products allegedly have been developed after or are based on “years of scientific research.” Understanding the value of a registered trademark, these companies instruct their counsel to file a trademark application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for the product’s name.  After receiving an office action indicating that the mark is rejected because the mark is viewed as being descriptive, the company counters that the mark is fanciful and really doesn’t have any meaning in order to get the registration. Then, there is an FTC investigation over substantiation for some of the efficacy claims about the product. The company could be in a predicament. It needs to show the FTC that it has “competent and reliable scientific evidence” for its product’s claims.  However, it has now admitted to another government agency that it made up the name.  While this is certainly not damning evidence of deception, this may not help the company’s chances of convincing the FTC that it has complied with the law. You can see how this innocent act may be viewed by the FTC.  Not only did the company make up the suspect claims, it even made up the scientific sounding name to further deceive consumers. Certainly, companies should not forego making valid arguments to get trademark registrations. However, they should make sure that nothing is being said that could later detract from any arguments that they need to make should an FTC investigation arise.  Companies should harmonize their IP and regulatory strategies in order to minimize any later issues.